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Salt, water, and vasopressin in polycystic kidney disease

  • Vicente E. Torres
    Correspondence
    Correspondence: Vicente E. Torres, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
    Affiliations
    Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
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      Excessive salt intake and vasopressin may promote cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline in chronic kidney disease. Kramers et al. confirmed the effects of salt in a large autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cohort. Copeptin mediated 72% and 25% of the salt effects on GFR decline and kidney growth. Kidney growth did not significantly contribute to the copeptin-mediated salt effect on GFR. Differences in kidney growth and GFR decline trajectories and factors other than cyst growth contributing to GFR decline may explain the divergent effects.
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      Linked Article

      • Salt, but not protein intake, is associated with accelerated disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease
        Kidney InternationalVol. 98Issue 4
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          In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), there are only scarce data on the effect of salt and protein intake on disease progression. Here we studied association of these dietary factors with the rate of disease progression in ADPKD and what the mediating factors are by analyzing an observational cohort of 589 patients with ADPKD. Salt and protein intake were estimated from 24-hour urine samples and the plasma copeptin concentration measured as a surrogate for vasopressin. The association of dietary intake with annual change in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and height adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) growth was analyzed with mixed models.
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